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The cover is now up...

August 29th, 2007 (01:43 pm)

Any day now, in a media studies section near you...

Comments

Posted by: Alice Dryden (huskyteer)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 12:52 pm (UTC)
Pertwee bike

Great cover and tempting titles - and Kevin's still around! I last saw him at my graduation.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 12:56 pm (UTC)
Hartnell words

This is a different Kevin Donnelly to ours - a veteran musicologist who admirably fought back his desire to turn his conference paper into a lecture on why the compositions of Keff McCulloch have no redeeming features.

Posted by: Alice Dryden (huskyteer)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:03 pm (UTC)

Surely there's not room in the fandom for two? Shame.

Posted by: The Mezzo Mongoose (miss_next)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 12:59 pm (UTC)

Fiona Moore and Alan Stevens? I know those two! :-)

Posted by: Alice Dryden (huskyteer)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:03 pm (UTC)
Max on shoephone

Me too! Are we related?

Posted by: The Mezzo Mongoose (miss_next)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:07 pm (UTC)

No, but we met, once, a very long time ago. I think it was at a Kaldor City signing in Barking.

Posted by: Alice Dryden (huskyteer)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:16 pm (UTC)
Hope's Huskies - Bunty cover

That would make sense, though my only memory of the day is of carrying props out to the car park. (I think the time Servalan invited me to perch on the arm of her chair was a separate occasion.)

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:04 pm (UTC)
Zen

Of course - you'll know Fiona and Alan through B7. (They have cropped up on my LJ, but generally under pseudonyms.)

Posted by: The Mezzo Mongoose (miss_next)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:08 pm (UTC)

Bless 'em. How are they getting on?

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:15 pm (UTC)
Horace Walpole

I haven't been in touch with Fiona for a few months, and there hasn't been much activity on Reasons to Hate Steven Spielberg or the Magic Bullet site for a little while, but they did launch their new book on The Prisoner a couple of weeks ago.

Posted by: The Mezzo Mongoose (miss_next)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:18 pm (UTC)

They were marvellous when I was going through my divorce and the aftermath thereof. Fiona provided counselling, and Alan made me laugh. :-)

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:41 pm (UTC)

Well done you!

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 01:56 pm (UTC)
DavidIcon

Thanks! I'd like to do more 'aca-fandom' stuff; I often think that if I had been setting off on a doctorate now I might have done something media-related and moved into that field, but at the time I was suspicious of the sociological language which peppered many of the books. I sometimes look at Henry Jenkins's blog, and remember remarking on him many years ago, when walking through part of MIT, as one of my favourite academics; but his interests in contemporary culture are much, much wider than mine.

Posted by: zephyr (vescoiya)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 02:23 pm (UTC)

Kudos to you, that's fantastic. Now when are we going to see the definitive guide to Dr Who by you?

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 03:50 pm (UTC)
DavidIcon

The book which I would like to write lies between James Chapman's Inside the Tardis and the About Time series of Lawrence Miles and Tat Wood. I have another idea which travels over less well-trodden ground, however... I just need to make the time to write up the proposal and get it into circulation!

Posted by: Delia (chainmailmaiden)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 02:30 pm (UTC)

Well done!

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 03:46 pm (UTC)
Hartnell words

Thanks! I know I've plugged the book before, a few months ago; its mention here reflects my impatience for my copies to be delivered. The cover isn't the one I chose - the contributors had a vote and I was in the minority.

Posted by: philmophlegm (philmophlegm)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 06:38 pm (UTC)
dalek

Well done! Incidentally, what was your preferred cover like? I quite like this one.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 11:24 pm (UTC)
JamieZoe

I preferred one which placed a kind of reflected lattice over the artist's impression of the first Pertwee title sequence which we see on the final cover, to give the impression of something being deconstructed. It was probably considered too obvious or too confusing.

Posted by: Flippancy provided by (il_mio_capitano)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 04:38 pm (UTC)
thumbs

Excellent. Looking forward to reading it.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 04:44 pm (UTC)
DavidIcon

The good thing about MUP is that they put these things out in paperback, not always the case (and I think one of their series of books about television now comes out in hardbacks only, aimed at libraries).

Posted by: viala_qilarre (viala_qilarre)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 04:40 pm (UTC)

Fabulous! How exciting! I shall buy a copy. (The paperback though, I'm afraid.)

Thing is, though - looking down the titles - *is* City of Death the best story...?

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 04:49 pm (UTC)
regeneration

I'm not getting any royalties, so I'm happy for people to buy the paperback! I'm just glad that there is a paperback, and hope that MUP pursue the crossover market between the academic audience and fandom with zeal.

I think that there was a time, in the early 1990s, when City of Death topped polls, but The Caves of Androzani reigned supreme for much longer. Neither story is currently the highest-placed 'old series' entry over at Doctor Who Dynamic Rankings, though at time of writing they are placed at 7 and 5 respectively.

Posted by: viala_qilarre (viala_qilarre)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 05:27 pm (UTC)

What an interesting list. I wouldn't agree with it - but then of course, no single individual would!

Boo that you're not getting royalties. :(

Posted by: philmophlegm (philmophlegm)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 06:43 pm (UTC)
I'vegotasportscar

I must be fairly typical. If you separate out new and old (and I think you should because there's something of an in-built bias towards recent stuff), then that list looks pretty much like one I'd draw up.

Surprised by Seeds of Doom being as high as 23 though. (Even more surprised that it seems to belong to 1963!)

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 11:27 pm (UTC)
Styre

There always seems to be an in-built bias towards recent material, despite attempts at weighting.

I think Seeds of Doom is one I'd rate highly and then be surprised at where it turns up... I think all the Hinchcliffe-Holmes era stories are very strong, but this is hardly a radical new assessment.

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 09:29 pm (UTC)
Outsider

What a strange poll. From a cursory glance, the old series results seem similar to the DWM 35th and 40th anniversary polls, but the new series ones (a) are done by episode, not by story (pet peeve of mine - although I'm still in two minds about Utopia), (b) show an expected but depressing tendency for anything new to do disproportionately well, except that (c) Daleks in Manhattan and Evolution of the Daleks can be found bringing up the rear along with such unloved tales as The Twin Dilemma and Time and the Rani. I would not have listed that story as being the most serious of the many, many crimes against narrative coherence, aesthetics, and common sense committed by the new series.

Of course, polls always say more about those polled and the method of polling than anything else.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 11:44 pm (UTC)

I agree that like has to be compared with like as far as possible - so I think that the two-parters of the modern era should be treated as single stories. After all, no-one has polls in which we are asked to vote for A Holiday for the Doctor against The OK Corral, for example.

I now tend towards considering Utopia as the first episode of three; Phil Collinson has described Utopia/The Sound of Drums/Last of the Time Lords as 'our first three-parter' somewhere, and I don't think that was after the fact.

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 11:59 pm (UTC)
Outsider

I think I'm going to have to suspend judgment on Utopia's status until after a second viewing.

The model in its conception seems to have been The Keeper of Traken and its 'semi-detached' relationship to Logopolis. Utopia certainly had a different director and was made separately to the following episodes, but then again several 1960s stories had different directors (excluding emergencies), and various unconnected stories (mainly in the eighties) were made as a single 'bloc' (to use an anachronistic term), so that doesn't prove much.

Mind you, part of me sees The Ark in Space and The Sontaran Experiment as a six part story, and I'm torn between seeing Logopolis and Castrovalva as either a cross-season, eight part rambling epic or an arc of four loosely connected two part stories.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 30th, 2007 12:37 am (UTC)
Hartnell words

The model in its conception seems to have been The Keeper of Traken and its 'semi-detached' relationship to Logopolis.

Agreed; the establishment of a friendly character who is then possessed by the Master and physically transformed provides a set of blatant parallels, even though the details of the possession and transformation are different. I think that Utopia is more closely linked to the following two episodes than Traken was to Logopolis; the 'A' plot of Utopia turns out to have facilitated the Master's conquest of Earth.

Worthwhile points about Ark and Experiment though, as well as Logopolis/Castrovalva (though the latter's structure is more like 1.5:2.5:1.5:2.5, according to my impression).

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: August 30th, 2007 12:47 am (UTC)
Outsider

the 'A' plot of Utopia turns out to have facilitated the Master's conquest of Earth.

I forgot about that.

Logopolis/Castrovalva (though the latter's structure is more like 1.5:2.5:1.5:2.5, according to my impression).

Yes, I was simplifying (I'd say it's 1.66:2.33 etc., which is clumsy to write out)

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 30th, 2007 08:44 am (UTC)
salmon

Yes, I was simplifying (I'd say it's 1.66:2.33 etc., which is clumsy to write out)

It makes me wonder if Bidmead had seen the early production documents comparing Doctor Who to The World of Tim Frazer, the detective series from which Doctor Who borrowed the series-of-serials form, and encouraging new stories to start in the middle of episodes and not just at the end in time for a cliffhanger.

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 09:31 pm (UTC)
Outsider

Well done! I shall also be buying a copy, although I too will be opting for the paperback.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 11:47 pm (UTC)
Hartnell words

Thanks! I'd value your opinion on my chapter and on the other essays in the book. There are a substantial number which aren't based on papers from the 2004 Manchester conference - for example, neither Daniel O'Mahony nor Tat Wood were at the event.

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 11:50 pm (UTC)
Outsider

For financial reasons, I may not buy the book until some months after publication, but I dare say I'll post something about it on my blog at some point.

Posted by: Kargicq (kargicq)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 09:45 pm (UTC)

Congratulations!

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 29th, 2007 11:48 pm (UTC)

Thanks! It's travelling under the radar of the fan discussion forums as far as I can see; I wait to see if people notice it when it's published...

Posted by: But what if I'm a mermaid? (deepbluemermaid)
Posted at: August 30th, 2007 01:59 am (UTC)
academia definitions

That's wonderful news, congratulations!

Coincidentally, today I was asked to contribute to a book of conference papers. The weird part is that I didn't speak properly at the conference in question; I just chaired a session and gave a 10 minute linking talk. So I'll actually have to write something new. But, yay, getting published = very exciting!

*uses appropriate icon*

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: August 30th, 2007 08:42 am (UTC)
DavidIcon

I - or rather my colleague and I, and the colleague is doing most of the work - are trying to get a book of the colloquium we ran in April contracted. We have one rejection letter so far.

There's also another conference paper I'd like to return to, also from 2004; it was promised to the proceedings volume but there seems to be no sign of the volume actually happening.