?

Log in

No account? Create an account
parrot_knight [userpic]

On eucharistic theology

October 24th, 2007 (12:49 pm)
Tags:

Found via tree_and_leaf, though with determinedly contrasting results! It's not true that I don't care about "tradition or Scripture or Christian teaching", either...


Eucharistic theology
created with QuizFarm.com
You scored as Unitarian

You're a Unitarian. You don't really care about tradition or Scripture or Christian teaching. You'd rather tiptoe through the tulips than through theology.

Unitarian

81%

Zwingli

75%

Orthodox

19%

Calvin

19%

Catholic

13%

Luther

0%

Comments

Posted by: Virgers! How are we doing with those explosives? (tree_and_leaf)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 11:24 am (UTC)
Aargh! No!

That strikes me as a rather mean-spirited take on Unitarianism (even though I can never decide if you can be Christian if you don't affirm the Trinity).

On the other hand, at least it doesn't give such a frightening image as the 'Catholic' output, which produces a rather dodgy photo of Benedict XVI.† Very sad - I was hoping for a really over the top, borderline kitsch, monstrance, or something along those lines!

† Admittedly there aren't that many photos of the Pope that aren't vaguely frightening. It's the deep set eyes, I think - he was quite good looking in youth, if you can trust the one picture I've seen of him as a seminarian.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 12:13 pm (UTC)

I hadn't thought of it as mean-spirited - just someone having a narrow sense of fun. A.J.P. Taylor, in one of his books, casually says in the text that one early twentieth-century politician wasn't a Christian and then has a footnote to say that 'he was a Unitarian'.

My knowledge of Unitarianism is almost entirely historical, and derived from my finishing off the editing of the eighteenth-century Unitarian block of articles for TGW. The external adviser was the sort of veteran scholar whose response, when you challenged one of his references, that he was sure of it as he had checked it himself in 1948. I am certain that Theophilus Lindsey and the other Feathers' Tavern petitioners who broke away from the Church of England in the 1770s over the issue of the Trinity still regarded themselves as Christians, Lindsey opening a chapel in Essex Street, London, for the purpose of Unitarian worship and adapting the Anglican liturgy as the basis for a Unitarian one.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 12:18 pm (UTC)

As for the pope, I still remember the battle on Wikipedia on the day of his election to stop people replacing his picture with one of Emperor Palpatine from Star Wars...

Posted by: Pellegrina (pellegrina)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 12:14 pm (UTC)

I have Unitarian ancestors and tendencies. My local vicar called it a heresy, but wasn't able to explain why it was heretical to emphasise the oneness but not the threeness when I thought the whole point was the three-in-oneness.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 12:34 pm (UTC)

The majority of English Presbyterian and Congregationalist chapels became Unitarian in the nineteenth century, or so I've read; perhaps this also applied in parts of the USA.

Was this vicar a Catholic one in Milan?

Posted by: Pellegrina (pellegrina)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 01:08 pm (UTC)
Sillylily

No, the vicar of St George's Headstone. I only found out about the Unitarian connection a couple of years ago. I don't think this vicar had ever met anyone quite as heathen as me - raised in a Catholic country/schools but never christened, half Jewish but the wrong half and consequently never bat-mitzvah-ed. Been falling between stools all my life; the only categories that seem unequivocal are femaleness and (boring) whiteness of ancestry.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 02:17 pm (UTC)
Georgelick

I didn't know you'd had dealings with the local CofE... as for the heathenness, would the vicar have been more offended if you had been a flower-strewing pagan, or was it general godlessness?

Posted by: Pellegrina (pellegrina)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 02:47 pm (UTC)
Sillylily

He wasn't offended, but it was clear that he hadn't the faintest notion how to respond to someone who wasn't a lapsed Christian, but had grown up always slightly wistfully aware of being outside the fold, but reluctant to enter it solely for the purpose of following the herd, and possibly entirely lacking whatever mystical or spiritual bent may be necessary to experience faith as anything more nourishing or less willed than Pascal's wager. My sensation was that flower-strewing paganism would have attracted some scorn, but for social/class rather than religious/theological reasons.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 03:43 pm (UTC)

I have never known where to place myself religiously, though that's partly a function of my dislike of labels.

Posted by: Virgers! How are we doing with those explosives? (tree_and_leaf)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 10:32 pm (UTC)

My understanding of Unitarianism was that they don't believe in the three-in-oneness at all, and don't belive that Christ is God. Both of these are heretical from a Trinitarian Christian position.

Mind you, I know very little about Unitarianism, so I may just be going for incorrect hearsay...

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 03:33 pm (UTC)
Outsider

The last on-line religion quiz I did decided I was a Sikh...

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: October 24th, 2007 03:45 pm (UTC)

I think that this one would decide that you were a Unitarian. It's very much one for people who know which Christian denominational stances are being caricatured.