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parrot_knight [userpic]

DWM 397

June 25th, 2008 (03:17 pm)

On arriving in Oxford this lunchtime I went in search of the latest Doctor Who Magazine. It's a bagged issue, all the better to give readers a copy of one of the still-extensive overstocks of Doctor Who novelizations from mid-1980s and early-1990s reprintings. All WHSmith had were copies with Doctor Who and the Green Death; and while this is one of the best novelizations of one of the best third Doctor stories, I have three copies already, and decided that this wasn't worth a fourth. As a result of a diversion to Borders, I had a slightly wider selection: the aforementioned Green Death, plus Doctor Who - Mission to Magnus (based on a script from the first version of season 23, abandoned when Michael Grade wielded his axe in February 1985) and Doctor Who - Delta and the Bannermen. I went for the latter even though I already have it, as the version I have is the 1988 first impression (with Bannerman instead of Bannermen on the spine).

The well-kept surprise is the cover of the magazine when it is removed from the bag. All the straplines and the magazine logo have been printed on the bag, so that the cover itself displays (almost) only words familiar to anyone who saw the end of last Saturday's episode. A great gesture which shows how bound up with the progamme the magazine is prepared to be.

Comments

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:36 pm (UTC)

Which reminds me; I have posted the Green Death* and the Carnival of Monsters* back to you, with very many thanks.

*The Royal Mail Office are getting very las about what you post these days ... ;-)

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:37 pm (UTC)

Which reminds me - I have to thank you for their return, as they appeared behind my door this morning!

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:39 pm (UTC)

I enjoyed them hugely, especially Green Death. A real trip down memory lane; but I felt they stood up well beyond that.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:43 pm (UTC)

Did you watch any of the extras?

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:44 pm (UTC)

No!

*feels foolish*

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:51 pm (UTC)
pic#70424010

One on The Green Death was worth watching, where Mark Gatiss (in the guise of a Man Alive reporter) rounds up many of the actors for a 'Thirty Years On' mockumentary - including Jerome Willis as Stevens, gaining his suppressed first name of Jocelyn (writer Robert Sloman's day job was as a Sunday Times manager, but he hated the neo-managerialism being brought into the paper by his boss Jocelyn Stevens) and one of the miner actors playing his original character's camp academic brother.

Edited at 2008-06-25 02:51 pm (UTC)

Posted by: brewsternorth (brewsternorth)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 03:09 pm (UTC)

*crosses fingers that these extras will be on the Region 1 release*

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 03:58 pm (UTC)
Tom

Yes, they will be - the region 1 and region 2 DVD releases have been uniform for a long time now, with the exception of The Key to Time box set, which was rush-released early on in the US, and then had more extras added when it was released several years later in the UK.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:46 pm (UTC)

I agree with you about them standing up, too - Carnival of Monsters could easily be made today as its commentary about entertainment values and the attitudes of programme-makers to viewers is just as relevant. The Green Death is more of its time, but as a packaging of early 1970s environmentalism for Saturday teatimes it's very intelligent and very watchable.

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 02:38 pm (UTC)

las

That's "lax" ...

Posted by: brewsternorth (brewsternorth)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 03:08 pm (UTC)

Oo, yay Borders.

Interesting that there are still hiatus-era novelizations to be found. And yes, nifty that even DWM is spoilerproofing itself (a pity the same could not be said of "Radio Times", or so rumour has it).

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 03:11 pm (UTC)

There have already been complaints on my FList about this.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 04:07 pm (UTC)

'Hiatus-era' is the thing, really - the sudden downturn in Doctor Who's popularity in the mid-1980s, with BBC management seemingly queueing up to rubbish it, and the failure of the programme to break through in the USA in the way the BBC and the licence-holders had hoped, must have contributed towards the overstock of Target books. Between 1986 and 1990 I don't think any of the backlist bar Doctor Who and the Loch Ness Monster were reprinted, though several 1983-1985 reprints turned up with their covers having been stripped off and replaced so they could be repriced at £1.95 instead of £1.35-£1.50. (Happy days when paperbacks cost that little - mind you, when my grandmother bought Doctor Who and the Daleks for me, it was 40p...) Then of course there were the 'Doctor Who Classics' omnibus editions, which were a variation on the same theme.

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 04:05 pm (UTC)

I still subscribe to DWM so I had no choice but to receive The Armageddon Factor, fortunately not a book I already owned, although I would have preferred The Making of Doctor Who.

the cover itself displays (almost) only words familiar to anyone who saw the end of last Saturday's episode

I think I was more surprised and amused by the appearance of the words on the magazine than I was when they appeared on the episode.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 04:18 pm (UTC)

I wonder which distributor has The Making of Doctor Who? I'm tempted to check in Martin's in Summertown, as they are the only other newsagent I can think of in Oxford who take it.

Presumably The Making of... is available inexpensively from Burtons and other backstock dealers...

Posted by: philmophlegm (philmophlegm)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 05:31 pm (UTC)
ICAEW

"Delta and the Bannerman" is presumably a long-lost story whereby Sylvester McCoy's Doctor, aided by Ace and the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales, seek to clarify the purpose of the auditor's report and thereby seek to limit the parties to whom auditors owe a duty of care.


(Auditing joke. No, I don't expect anyone else to get it...)

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 05:40 pm (UTC)

I didn't get it, but did a Google search and might now. An infamous case in the Scottish courts a few years ago?

Posted by: philmophlegm (philmophlegm)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 09:07 pm (UTC)
ICAEW

Yes, the practical effects of which are the insertion into the audit report that accompanies any set of audited financial statements of a paragraph that clearly states to whom the report is addressed.

My job is making sure that JOLF auditors do their jobs properly. We gave one audit a bad grade last year for having omitted the Bannerman paragraph.

Posted by: viala_qilarre (viala_qilarre)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 07:34 pm (UTC)

I'll be looking for mine tomorrow. All my Target books are original printings, as far as I know.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 07:48 pm (UTC)

That's an achievement! My first first printings are rather battered, as I was a bit young to look after them...

Posted by: viala_qilarre (viala_qilarre)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 08:15 pm (UTC)

All mine are immaculate! I was a very earnest 10 year old.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: June 25th, 2008 08:20 pm (UTC)

By the time I was ten I was looking after them, or a bit earlier even; the ones I had when I was five lost their covers!