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parrot_knight [userpic]

Lost Metropolitan Line stations, and Northern Line routes

July 17th, 2008 (01:19 am)

I mentioned in conversation this evening that one former London Underground station, Marlborough Road on the Metropolitan, is now a Chinese restaurant. The Wikipedia page shows one picture of it; there are some more recent ones on Wikipedia Commons, like this one. There's lots of information about it at Abandoned Stations, and a page at Subterranea Britannica too.

There are lots of explorations of London's disused transport infrastructure which I haven't made yet; there's the Parkland Walk, for example, which covers much of the Great Northern Railway/LNER route from Finsbury Park to Highgate, which was closed after the 'Northern Heights' plan to incorporate it into the Northern Line was shelved (though Highgate to High Barnet and Mill Hill East was successfully converted).

Comments

Posted by: brewsternorth (brewsternorth)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 01:04 am (UTC)

Well well well.

The London Underground is fortunate that so many of its underground stations are still useful in their own way; alas, the NYC subway stations subject to a similar fate have not been so lucky. There was some talk at one stage of making the very first subway station (City Hall) into the crowning glory of a downtown transit museum, but interest, and funds, seem to have evaporated rapidly.

Notwithstanding which, there's a continuing interest in their ruins...

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 01:14 am (UTC)

Thanks for the link - I'll explore it more fully later!

Posted by: buckbeakbabie (buckbeakbabie)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 01:31 am (UTC)

the Parkland Walk, for example, which covers much of the Great Northern Railway/LNER route from Finsbury Park to Highgate

I live right beside that, I think... I'm definitely not far from it, because Finsbury Park is just down the road. :D What I'm thinking of is just beside Harringey Green Lanes station, its a nature reserve/pathway thing, that I have never gone into.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 01:53 am (UTC)

It's the other side of the East Coast Main Line from Harringay Green Lanes, heading north-west from Finsbury Park.

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 07:19 am (UTC)

Thanks for that - I've been interested for a while by the abandoned stations.

Edited at 2008-07-17 08:07 am (UTC)

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 10:07 am (UTC)

When I lived in London I did get to get on and off a train at Shoreditch, an experience none will have again. I visited the site of its replacement, Shoreditch High Street, last year, and gather from occasional updates on London Connections that things are fairly advanced there now.

Posted by: muuranker (muuranker)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 07:46 am (UTC)

I thought we had a book ....

We do have http://www.librarything.com/work/451360/book/12006476

(oh! spotted someone on my flist has it too!)

and http://www.librarything.com/work/2264430/book/10622045, but neither were what I was thinking of ...

here it is:

http://www.librarything.com/work/658013/book/10619221

The London Transport Museum has just started to librarything (http://www.librarything.com/profile/LondonTransportMus), which is great.

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 08:08 am (UTC)

We have "London's Disused Underground Stations", by JE Connor. (It's currently between "A Garden of Pleasant Flowers" and "A Cascade of Flowers" on the shelf - make of that what you will!)

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 17th, 2008 09:57 am (UTC)

I have two versions of Douglas Rose's Diagrammatic History, but I don't have the other two.

Posted by: ((Anonymous))
Posted at: July 18th, 2008 12:03 am (UTC)

Careful with this kind of thing. You know how allergic all those terribly sensitive Livejournal types are about "London". Don't want to be seen liking it or anything.

The "Heights" project's cancellation was a tragedy, although in view of postwar Green Belt policies probably inevitable anyway.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 18th, 2008 12:12 am (UTC)

The "Heights" project's cancellation was a tragedy, although in view of postwar Green Belt policies probably inevitable anyway.

Indeed. I have read somewhere of uncompleted viaduct arches standing in fields on the way to Bushey Heath, although some of the route of the extension beyond Edgware was taken over by the M1.