?

Log in

No account? Create an account
parrot_knight [userpic]

Unaccustomed linkage

July 10th, 2012 (09:16 pm)

I'm not usually one for linkspam, but here are a few items which have distracted me today:

  • For sale: Bush House. A landmark of BBC World Service history.
    • Christopher Middleton at The Telegraph mourns the end of an era; but how often is 'Lillibulero' played on the BBC World Service these days? Its associations are questionable to say the least.
  • Auction for BBC World Service
    • Here is the flysheet for the online auction mentioned in Middleton's article. If you want to set up your own worldwide broadcasting service, now is your chance.
  • Baroness Fauconberg and Conyers
    • The blog post is about the death of Lady Wendy Lycett, but peerage-spotters can welcome back the baronies of Fauconberg and Conyers to the extant peerage as Lady Wendy and her elder sister Lady Diana Miller were co-heirs to those titles. At the age of 92, I think it's unlikely that Diana, the new Baroness Fauconberg and Conyers (once she has had the automatic termination of the abeyance recognised by the Crown Office, and been added to the Roll of the Peerage) will be seeking election to the House of Lords, but you never know.
  • Lords reform: this will be our last chance for a generation
    • With the vote on Lords reform dropped, the elected hereditaries look as if they will be hanging on alongside the life peers and bishops for a little while yet. Peter Hain doesn't I think have all the details right on the measure the government had intended to put before the Commons tonight, but as he says it could have been amended.
  • Before Adam, by Jack London
    • Project Gutenberg e-book of Jack London's 1906 novel about an early homo species, possibly in the literary geneaology of the first Doctor Who story.
Also posted at http://sir-guinglain.dreamwidth.org/524868.html.

Comments

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: July 10th, 2012 10:01 pm (UTC)
Marxist

Psst, wanna buy a used radio station?

I'm in favour of Lords reform, but I don't like what was proposed at all. I can't really see the point of two elected chambers; I'd rather have a unicameral legislature or, much better, an independently-appointed revising chamber (but appointed how and by whom? Tricky). But then, I've been called an elitist before and I certainly think democracy isn't a flawless concept (I'm of the Winston Churchill school - democracy is the worst form of government except for all the others that have been tried) so Hain saying "this is democractic therefore it must be good" seems question-begging to me.

I think there simply isn't much popular support for Lords reform and AV - to be blunt, most people don't care, they simply accept 'this is how we do things in Britain.' It isn't like manhood suffrage or female suffrage that would make an immediate and tangible difference to lots of "ordinary people" (to use a phrase politicians love and which I find a little Orwellian).

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 10th, 2012 10:06 pm (UTC)
UKPolitics

I detest the political jargon of 'ordinary people' and 'hardworking families' too - I find it demeans the very audience the politicians are targeting.

I don't agree with Hain on democracy as a panacea either. I'd rather have a substantially elected chamber or a much smaller appointed revising committee.

I have never supported AV except as an intermediate; I'd like a House of Commons elected by an open list single transferable vote system in multi-member constituencies. I don't think there is much popular support for the existing system, either.

Posted by: daniel_saunders (daniel_saunders)
Posted at: July 10th, 2012 10:09 pm (UTC)
Marxist

I don't think there is much popular support for the existing system, either.

Perhaps not, but the status quo always enjoys a massive advantage in a situation where hardly anyone really cares either way.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 10th, 2012 10:13 pm (UTC)
Devil's Crown

PR certainly needed a better campaign in its favour than the one it received; and I'd not have bothered the population with a referendum anyway, but legislated without it.

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: July 11th, 2012 07:19 pm (UTC)

One of you two will know - how recent an innovation are the Law Lords?

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 11th, 2012 07:21 pm (UTC)

1885, Law Life Peerage Act, I think (following an attempt a few decades before, which the Lords threw out as unconstitutional, ruling that a life peer could not take their seat in the Lords).

Posted by: wellinghall (wellinghall)
Posted at: July 11th, 2012 07:22 pm (UTC)

Thank you.

Posted by: parrot_knight (parrot_knight)
Posted at: July 11th, 2012 07:40 pm (UTC)

Apologies - checking, I see that the act was passed in 1876.

ETA: And here they all are!

Edited at 2012-07-11 07:40 pm (UTC)